Home Buy Now Who Am I? Testimonials Gallery Contact
© 2018 SWDesign
How to climb three grades harder (and cruise those routes you’ve always dreamed of doing...)

So why can't you get any better?

It's fair to say, though, that this guy is the exception. In my experience, most climbers try to improve but fail miserably – because they go about it in the wrong way. When I used to train at a major climbing wall (The Foundry in Sheffield , UK ), on a busy night, there might be 120 people trying to get better the wrong way and 5 people (if that!) getting better the right way.

Is climbing just about grades?

But is climbing just about grades? No, of course not! Climbing is about joy, the joy of movement. But if a climber tells you they're not bothered about grades, well, are they really being honest? It's basic human nature to want to do better. We've gone from living in caves to exploring outer  space. We now know that the only limits to human progress are self-imposed ones. Self-imposed limits in climbing? You may have heard a few. You may even have used them yourself…

All the reasons boil down to just two:

    1. You haven't tried.

    2. You haven't tried the right way.

“So how do you know?”

OK, let's take the first reason. Recently, I met a Scots climber in Spain . He'd started at the local climbing wall and found some buddies, before deciding to enrol his long-suffering wife in the cause. He climbed F6b and had led one 6b+. Night after night, he moaned into his beer, “I'll never be able to climb 6c! I'll never be able to do it…” One night, I finally got fed up with all this crap and tersely asked, “Why the hell not?” His reply was, “I can't. I just can't, that's all.” “So how many 6cs have you tried?” “Well I haven't tried any,” he muttered, glowering, as he belatedly started to get the message. “So then how do you know you can't do them?” Ouch!!! The plain fact was that this guy hadn't even tried. And one thing's for sure:

“If you don't try to climb harder, you won't!!!”

When you try to get better the wrong way:

You get injured (and give up!) You fail to make improvements (and give up!) You make slight improvements which don't last (and give up!) You sometimes even get worse (and give up!)
While such trying may be commendable (at least you're making an effort), it's misplaced effort. It's just setting yourself up for eventual failure. Some people get so frustrated with lack of progress that they give up climbing altogether – which is absolutely tragic!
Want to know more?

So which one are You ?

“I'm too old. (I'm 25, 37, 49, 55, etc, etc…)” “I haven't got enough power/reach/suppleness…” “I can climb 6a but I just can't climb 6b.” “I'm the wrong shape.” (usually means too heavy!) “I can't climb overhangs/cracks/offwiths/slabs.” “I haven't got time to train properly.” “I've got weak fingers/arms/elbows/back.” “My head's not in shape.” “I can climb 6c but I can't climb 7a” “I just can't seem to get any better!”
“I just can't seem to get any better!” Well give me a new quickdraw for every time I've heard that one! Hell, I've even used it myself… (And I was using that old “too old” routine back in 1974, when I was a mere 21.)

How a middle-aged, ‘distinctly average’ climber from

Sheffield accidentally discovered a formula for

climbing success.

 He improved by six grades – from F6c (5.11b) to F7c (5.12d). One climber even went from F4 (5.7) to F7a/7a+ (5.11d/12a) - About 10 grades!!!
NOW ‘YOU’ CAN QUICKLY LEARN HOW TO CLIMB ‘THREE GRADES HARDER’
Home Buy Now Who am I? Testimonials Gallery Contact How to climb three Grades harder How a middle-aged, ‘distinctly average’ climber from Sheffield accidentally discovered a formula for climbing success.   He improved by six grades – from F6c (5.11b) to F7c (5.12d). One climber even went from F4 (5.7) to F7a/7a+ (5.11d/12a) - About 10 grades!!! NOW ‘YOU’ CAN QUICKLY LEARN HOW TO CLIMB  ‘THREE GRADES HARDER’

Is climbing just about grades?

But is climbing just about grades? No, of course not! Climbing is about joy, the joy of movement. But if a climber tells you they're not bothered about grades, well, are they really  being honest? It's basic human nature to want to do better. We've gone from living in caves to exploring outer space. We now know that the only limits to human progress are self-imposed ones. Self-imposed limits in climbing? You may have heard a few. You may even have used them yourself…

So which one are You ?

“I'm too old. (I'm 25, 37, 49, 55, etc, etc…)” “I haven't got enough power/reach/suppleness…” “I can climb 6a but I just can't climb 6b.” “I'm the wrong shape.” (usually means too heavy!) “I can't climb overhangs/cracks/offwiths/slabs.” “I haven't got time to train properly.” “I've got weak fingers/arms/elbows/back.” “My head's not in shape.” “I can climb 6c but I can't climb 7a” “I just can't seem to get any better!”
“I just can't seem to get any better!” Well give me a new quickdraw for every time I've heard that one! Hell, I've even used it myself… (And I was using that old “too old” routine back in 1974, when I was a mere 21.)

So why can't you get any better?

All the reasons boil down to just two:

    1. You haven't tried.

    2. You haven't tried the right way.

OK, let's take the first reason. Recently, I met a Scots climber in Spain . He'd started at the local climbing wall and found some buddies, before deciding to enrol his long-suffering wife in the cause. He climbed F6b and had led one 6b+. Night after night, he moaned into his beer, “I'll never be able to climb 6c! I'll never be able to do it…” One night, I finally got fed up with all this crap and tersely asked, “Why the hell not?” His reply was, “I can't. I just can't, that's all.” “So how many 6cs have you tried?” “Well I haven't tried any,” he muttered, glowering, as he belatedly started to get the message. “So then how do you know you can't do them?” Ouch!!! The plain fact was that this guy hadn't even tried. And one thing's for sure:

“So how do you know?”

“If you don't try to climb harder, you won't!!!”

It's fair to say, though, that this guy is the exception. In my experience, most climbers try to improve but fail miserably – because they go about it in the wrong way. When I used to train at a major climbing wall (The Foundry in Sheffield , UK ), on a busy night, there might be 120 people trying to get better the wrong way and 5 people (if that!) getting better the right way.

When you try to get better the wrong way:

You get injured (and give up!) You fail to make improvements (and give up!) You make slight improvements which don't last (and give up!) You sometimes even get worse (and give up!)
While such trying may be commendable (at least you're making an effort), it's misplaced effort. It's just setting yourself up for eventual failure. Some people get so frustrated with lack of progress that they give up climbing altogether – which is absolutely tragic!
Want to know more?
© 2018 SWDesign
(And cruise those routes you’ve always dreamed of doing)
Menu Buy Now Who am I? Contact How to climb Three grades harder

How a middle-aged, ‘distinctly average

climber from Sheffield accidentally

discovered a formula for climbing success.

 He improved by six grades – from F6c (5.11b) to F7c (5.12d). One climber even went from F4 (5.7) to F7a/7a+ (5.11d/12a) - About 10 grades!!!

NOW ‘YOU’ CAN QUICKLY LEARN HOW TO

CLIMB ‘THREE GRADES HARDER’

Is climbing just about grades?

But is climbing just about grades? No, of course not! Climbing is about joy, the joy of movement. But if a climber tells you they're not bothered about grades, well, are they really being honest? It's basic human nature to want to do better. We've gone from living in caves to exploring outer space. We now know that the only limits to human progress are self-imposed ones. Self-imposed limits in climbing? You may have heard a few. You may even have used them yourself…

So which one are You ?

“I'm too old. (I'm 25, 37, 49, 55, etc, etc…)” “I haven't got enough power/reach/suppleness…” “I can climb 6a but I just can't climb 6b.” “I'm the wrong shape.” (usually means too heavy!) “I can't climb overhangs/cracks/offwiths/slabs.” “I haven't got time to train properly.” “I've got weak fingers/arms/elbows/back.” “My head's not in shape.” “I can climb 6c but I can't climb 7a” “I just can't seem to get any better!”
“I just can't seem to get any better!” Well give me a new quickdraw for every time I've heard that one! Hell, I've even used it myself… (And I was using that old “too old” routine back in 1974, when I was a mere 21.)

So why can't you get any better?

All the reasons boil down to just two:

    1. You haven't tried.

    2. You haven't tried the right way.

OK, let's take the first reason. Recently, I met a Scots climber in Spain . He'd started at the local climbing wall and found some buddies, before deciding to enrol his long-suffering wife in the cause. He climbed F6b and had led one 6b+. Night after night, he moaned into his beer, “I'll never be able to climb 6c! I'll never be able to do it…” One night, I finally got fed up with all this crap and tersely asked, “Why the hell not?” His reply was, “I can't. I just can't, that's all.” “So how many 6cs have you tried?” “Well I haven't tried any,” he muttered, glowering, as he belatedly started to get the message. “So then how do you know you can't do them?” Ouch!!! The plain fact was that this guy hadn't even tried. And one thing's for sure:

“If you don't try to climb harder, you won't!!!”

It's fair to say, though, that this guy is the exception. In my experience, most climbers try to improve but fail miserably – because they go about it in the wrong way. When I used to train at a major climbing wall (The Foundry in Sheffield , UK ), on a busy night, there might be 120 people trying to get better the wrong way and 5 people (if that!) getting better the right way.

When you try to get better the wrong way:

You get injured (and give up!) You fail to make improvements (and give up!) You make slight improvements which don't last (and give up!) You sometimes even get worse (and give up!)
While such trying may be commendable (at least you're making an effort), it's misplaced effort. It's just setting yourself up for eventual failure. Some people get so frustrated with lack of progress that they give up climbing altogether – which is absolutely tragic!
Want to know more? Legal Notice
(and cruise the routes you’ve dreamed of)

“So how do you know?”